A Dingell dally

If U.S. Rep. John Dingell, D.-Mich., isn’t a walking conflict of interest, there needs to be a new definition of the phrase.

He is the chairman of the influential House Energy and Commerce Committee, while his wife, Debbie, reins as a senior executive at General Motors and a member of the family that founded the company. How can John be tough and fair to the auto industry when he sleeps next to a person that will be the most affected?

john-dingell

President-elect Barack Obama is asking for a bailout of the auto industry, something that The New York Times columnist David Brooks calls “A Bailout to Nowhere.” To no surprise, Dingell supports the muti-billion bailout.

U.S. Rep. Henry Waxman, D-Calif., is now rightfully challenging Dingell’s chairmanship. Waxman is an environmental advocate who believes the auto industry needs reform, not free money after, in part, bad business decisions.

Dingell will become the longest serving member of Congress in February, and if “change” has supposedly come to Washington, then it must not stop at the presidency.

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3 responses to “A Dingell dally

  1. Luke "the smartest greder" greder

    Is it not an elected official’s job to protect the interests of their constituents? His constituents reside in an area that would be devastated by letting the ‘big 3’ go bankrupt, so why shouldn’t he feel the responsibility of pushing a bailout for his constituency. That is politics. If you feel that change is needed, maybe you should also address the primaries and how Iowa is allowed to have such influence on presidential politics. The list goes on, and on, and on…

  2. Is it not the job of a congressmen to serve the interests of his constituents? Since his constituents would be direct benefactors of a bailout of the ‘big 3’ he should be willing to fight for such a cause. Granted his wife is an employee and her family has a personal pride in GM’s perseverance, this does not mean his decision are solely based upon the influence of his wife and her family. Rather an economic stimulus package directed at his constituents would benefit most of the +500,000 whom he represents which just happens to include his wife. Is this not also that case with almost every congressmen/women? Do they not push for causes that directly benefit their constituents? Let me know the next time you hear an elected official from Iowa talk about getting rid of agricultural subsidies (I am sure there might be a couple but you get my point). I agree with the need for change, but remember that this is America. The capitalist foundation is not very rewarding of altruism so why should the employees of the ‘big 3’ and the people who would be affected by their failure be forced to take such a stance when it is their well being on the line. Just so you know I agree with Brook’s Times article, I just want you to think about it if it were your company lining up for a much needy handout.

  3. That was very alturistic of you to flatter your bro and post on the Tank. I guess I didn’t put enough “Think” into the Tank, because I guess I lost my point.

    Supporting constituents: fine. Chairman of Committee: conflict of interest.

    I empathize with the auto industry’s estimated job loss, but I’ve had enough of the special-interest bailouts.

    $700 billion for money-grubbing investors at AIG, among others. $10 billion a month in Iraq for the military-industrial complex at Lockhead Martin, among many others. And $25 billion for poor business decisions at GM, among two others.

    I agree. I want much-needed handouts, but for the middle class. Let’s talk about job production from 21st century energy. Let’s talk compromise — since the recession put a stop to universal health care — and be bipartisan and go with John McCain’s plan of health care tax credits. (At least that does something for you and me.)

    I want politicians to completely and truly represent their constituents and not help executives, regardless of if its your wife or not.

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